Month: August 2012

Video Tutorial: How to Align the Bulb of a Fluorescence Lamp Housing

Fluorescence microscopy is one of the most popular techniques used in life science research labs, especially in biology and live-cell imaging experiments. The traditional light source for fluorescence excitation is a fluorescence lamp housing with mercury burner. A prerequisite for achieving bright and homogeneous excitation is the correct centering and alignment of the bulb inside …

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Video Tutorial: How to Change the Bulb of a Fluorescence Lamp Housing

When applying fluorescence microscopy in biological applications, a lamp housing with mercury burner is the most common light source. As the average lifetime of a mercury bulb is approximately 300 hours, users should take care to change the bulb regularly to avoid it exploding. This video tutorial shows how to change the bulb of a …

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How a Fingerprint Is Traced to the Person Who Made It – Interactive Microscope System Facilitates Dactyloscopist Training

“We work from the general to the specific. For the first phase, in which we identify the pattern and look at the anatomic features, we only need a magnifier with up to 7x magnification. If we want to examine the fingerprint in more detail, we use a stereomicroscope, which provides up to 50x magnification. This …

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Label-free FLIM

In fluorescence microscopy generally autofluorescence is viewed as a detrimental side-effect inherent to many biological samples. It tends to overlap with endogenous fluorescence labels sometimes masking its intensity. It can cause difficulties with spectral channel separation and with quantitation of intensities for ratiometric analysis. The often very broad emission spectra of autofluorescence can render it …

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FRET with FLIM

Since FRET decreases the donor lifetime one can quantify the extent to which FRET occurs, provided the donor lifetime without FRET is known. This donor lifetime τ serves as an absolute reference against which the FRET sample is analyzed. Therefore, FLIM–FRET is internally calibrated – a property alleviating many of the shortcomings of intensity-based FRET …

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Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations of fluorescence intensity in a sub-femtolitre volume to detect such parameters as the diffusion time, number of molecules or dark states of fluorescently labeled molecules. The technique was independently developed by Watt Webb and Rudolf Rigler during the early 1970s. Source link